‘I can’t believe I got this far’: Army psychologist’s meme of the ‘good soldier’

The Army psychologist Phil Robertson is a favorite of many, with a large following among veterans who have experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI).

He is also an avid reader of books on psychology and the psychology of war.

His meme of a “good soldier” has been circulating online for several weeks.

It has gained almost 600,000 views and generated a million comments.

Some have commented on the meme, which has gained more than 20,000 likes, with some claiming they would have preferred a different therapist.

“I think this is one of the more hilarious things I have ever seen on the internet,” said one commenter.

I can’t say I blame anyone for laughing at this.” “

It is a good example of what I would call the ‘humblebrag’ meme.

I can’t say I blame anyone for laughing at this.”

But the meme has also drawn criticism, with one commenter pointing out that the Army psychologist is “unethical and dangerous” and “unfit to be in the Army”.

“What a load of crap.

You are unfit to be a psychologist in any way shape or form,” he wrote.

“He is unethical, dangerous, and I hope he goes to hell.

It’s the same story as the whole ‘good-war-and-love’ thing.”

A spokesman for the Army’s Psychological Operations Command said the meme was “not representative of the Psychological Operations Force”.

“The meme is a reflection of our culture and the standards of our troops,” the spokesman said.

“Psychological Operations Force officers are responsible for the conduct of their officers, and they are also responsible for ensuring that the standards and behaviours of the force are being met.” “

One commenter said it was “just another example of how the Army is trying to make its reputation as the ‘greater good’ by showing the soldiers who go out and do their jobs the appreciation they deserve.” “

Psychological Operations Force officers are responsible for the conduct of their officers, and they are also responsible for ensuring that the standards and behaviours of the force are being met.”

One commenter said it was “just another example of how the Army is trying to make its reputation as the ‘greater good’ by showing the soldiers who go out and do their jobs the appreciation they deserve.”

“If it’s an Army psychologist, then why are they going out and doing their job?” he wrote, adding: “I hope you die of TBI and that all your children and grandchildren die of it.”

One user said: “It’s just another example why I hate the Army.”

Another wrote: “If the Army was so concerned about TBI, why were they not putting more people in harm’s way?”

Another wrote that he “will never wear this mask of an Army psychological operations psychologist again”.

“I know they will be doing better to get rid of him,” he added.

“This is just another reminder that it’s the Army that has a reputation for ‘honest and ethical behaviour’ that makes them such an easy target for the TBI industry.”